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Monthly Archives: March 2018

Grilling During Winter

Keep extra fuel

If you’re grilling using charcoal, it’s ideal to have some extra as charcoal burns quicker because of the cold and the wind – you don’t want your barbecue to be cut short because you’ve run out of fuel. If you’re grilling using gas, make sure that your tank is full before each barbecue session to make sure that your grill is able to maintain the right temperatures to cook food evenly.

Don’t over check

Once the lid is down, set your timer and wait for your food to cook properly. When you check too much, the winter weather will cause your grill’s temperature to drop and your food won’t be cooked evenly. Keep the lid closed and check only when necessary.

Practice safety

During winter, the grease can accumulate at the bottom of your grill quickly which increases the risk of fire. Have a bottle of water ready (it’s not as easy to access the hose during winter as it is in summer time) or a fire extinguisher ready in case of fire or flare ups.

Pre-heat your grill earlier

When the weather is cold, your grill takes a lot longer to heat up before you can cook anything on it. You also have to allow some time to melt off the grease first. Also, it’s ideal to pre-heat your serving platter – when the food is cooked, you don’t want it to cool too quickly. Serve warm, delicious grilled food on a pre-heated serving plate.

Turkey String Lift

The most convenient method of moving a cooked turkey from its place in the wrapping foil to its place on the carving dish is through the use of a String Lift. While double carving forks can be used, the possibility of dropping the steaming hot bird are still high. Using gloves is definitely out of the question, too!

The answer is an ancient technique, known as The String Lift Technique. A String Lift is exactly what its name implies: a lifting sling for picking up large, heavy, awkward items like a cooked turkey!

The String Lift acts as a protective sling, surrounding the bird and making it easier to lift and to transport from cooking pan to carving dish.

Commercial String Lifts are available, however, it is our experience that most stores don’t carry the Lifts because people are unfamiliar with them, don’t know how to use them, and as a result commercial string lifts are not a great seller.

HOW TO MAKE A TURKEY STRING LIFT:

Cut an 80″ length of heavy cotton Butcher’s twine.

Knot ends together to make a loop. Put a single knot in center of loop.

Place second figure eight knot 3″ to right of first knot.

Place third figure eight knot 3″ to the left of first knot.

Center bird on center knot.

Draw string loops around and up over bird’s wings and legs during cooking.

To Use:

Unwrap the foil from the turkey breast and the legs and wings.

Grasp a loop in each hand.

Gently lift the turkey straight up off of the foil sheet.

Ask a helper to loosen any foil that tries to cling to the turkey as it is being hoisted.

Move the turkey to the cutting board and drape the Sling Lift away from the turkey.

It is not necessary to remove the Lift from under the turkey while carving the bird.

Recipes Rustic Spanish Bread

Ingredients

2 3/4 cups water
5 teaspoons or 2 packets of active dry yeast
7 cups (2 pounds, 2 1/2 ounces) of bread flour (You can substitute all purpose flour; reduce water to 2 1/2 cups)
1 tablespoon of salt
1/4 cup olive oil, preferably extra virgin

Instructions

Sprinkle the yeast over slightly warm (95 degree) water in a small bowl or measuring cup. Briefly stir it lightly followed by letting the mixture sit for approximately 10 minutes.

Measure out your flour and place it in a bowl of a kitchen mixer with a dough hook attached. If making by hand, place the flour in a large mixing bowl.

Turn on the mixer, add salt to the flour, and allow the dough to mix well. Slowly drizzle the olive oil into the flour as the mixer is running. If making the bread dough by hand use a whisk.

Slowly drizzle in the yeast and water mixture, allowing the dough to knead by the machine for four minutes.

If making the dough by hand, combine the flour with the yeast and water mixture using a wooden spoon, then turn the dough out onto a floured surface and knead for five minutes.

After kneading, you should have a smooth, springy like dough that bounces back lightly when pressed with your finger.

Cover the dough while in the bowl with a piece of waxed paper that has been sprayed with cooking spray with a kitchen towel. Let rise for 1 hour or until doubled.

Knead the risen dough by hand on a floured surface for about a minute to remove air. Form the dough into 2 equal-size balls, and place on a 15-inch baking sheet.

Cooking Fish On The Grill

Choose good quality fish

While frozen goods are an option, the fresh variety is most ideal. When at the market or store buying fish, be aware of its smell – there is indeed that distinct odor but it shouldn’t be too strong and won’t make your pinch your nose together. Aim for one that is firm to the touch with moist, shiny skin and pink gills. The meat should be white, not beige or yellow. If you must buy frozen fish, go only for those well-packaged ones – tightly wrapped in plastic without dryness or freezer burns and displayed in a bright and clean section.

Prepare it right for the grill

Experts recommend to grill the fish on the day of purchase, depending on the packaging’s “use-by” date if bought frozen. If you got it fresh, immediately clean it and transfer it to a container. Cover it tightly then refrigerate until ready to grill. If you got it frozen, keep it in its original packaging then refrigerate as well. Marinate for only about 3 to 4 hours as the meat of fish is soft and could easily get mushy. Tuna, swordfish and other dry, firm and thick fish are best for marinating. When grilling delicate ones such as flounder or tilapia, it’s ideal to wrap them in foil packets so that they won’t fall apart on your grill.

Grill it right

When you’re ready for the grill, make sure that your fish is dry as a wet one won’t sear. To prepare your fish, rinse it with cold water then use a paper towel to pat it dry. If you’re not using any marinade, brush the fish with oil then sprinkle it lightly with salt and black pepper before it hits the flames. Oil the grates and pre-heat the grill – this will help prevent the fish from sticking to your grill.